Conservatory Costs

So you have decided it’s the right time to extend your home with a new conservatory and are now wondering about “how much does a conservatory cost?”

To be straight to the point, there is a very wide range of conservatory costs in the market. You can probably find conservatory prices that range from as little as £6,000 up to £20,000 or more. But what your new conservatory extension will actually cost is going to depend, mainly on the style of the extension and the size.

However, you also have to bear in mind that the overall design features and the materials used in the frames, or type of roof, will also have an influence, as will a couple of other things.

Here we will take a look at the most popular conservatory styles, along with Orangery conservatories, conservatory roofs, and give you a guide to the likely costs involved.

What are the most popular conservatories & how much do they cost?

A guide to features & conservatory prices for each design.

online conservatory pricesThe prices below are just a general guide, and will only give you a rough idea of what to expect. For an accurate price you should have a professional come to your home, discuss your requirements, survey the property and then come up with a written quote.

If you would like to get a selection of free quotes from accredited installers, just send us some simple details & we will do the rest.

Conservatory Costs and Designs

Many Conservatory Designs to Choose From

Lean to Conservatory costs.

lean to conservatory costsLean to designs are amongst some of the cheapest conservatories to buy. The simple rectangular shape and single sided, sloped, roof is what lean to conservatories are best known for.

A Lean to conservatory can be used almost anywhere, for any type of home. Modern lean to conservatories have been given a makeover, with many designs featuring bifold doors and roofs that angle in different directions. It’s now quite popular to rotate, or even reverse, the slope to create very attractive rooms.

How much does a lean to conservatory cost?

 

online conservatory prices

Victorian Conservatory costs.

Victorian conservatoryThis style of conservatory is quite ornate with a multi-faceted high roof. The basic shape is of two straight sides with the3rd side, or end of the room, finishing in a 3 or 5 facet bay. The overall impression is one of a curved, or rounded, conservatory.

Very often seen with French doors and low level dwarf walls, Victorian conservatories are not well suited for “tight-spots” and work better as medium or larger sized rooms.

How much does a Victorian conservatory cost?

 

online conservatory prices

Edwardian & Georgian Conservatory Costs.

Edwardian ConservatoryBoth of these types of period conservatory look quite similar with their square or rectangular (usually square) shape. They also feature multi-sided high vaulted, and sometimes hipped, roofing.

The biggest difference is really in the detail. Of the 2 conservatory styles, Georgian came first and are quite ornate, much like Victorian conservatories. The Edwardian period came after the Victorian era and are much less ornate – almost as a rebellion against the “fussy” styling of the previous designs.

Both of these designs work well as medium sized or large conservatories. If they are too small, it makes the room look out of proportion.

How much does an Edwardian Conservatory Cost?
How much does a Georgian Conservatory Cost?

 

P-shape Conservatory Costs. – Bespoke Conservatories Prices.

For large conservatories, very often a couple of designs are combined to create a new style. Invariably, they are named after letters of the alphabet, simply because the floor plan somewhat resembles the shape of that particular capital letter.

shaped conservatoriesGood examples of this hybrid conservatory style are:

  • P-shape Conservatories: A combination of a lean to and Victorian design. Typically, a lean-to will form the “leg” and a Victorian will form the top of the “P”.
  • B-shape Conservatories: Two Victorian conservatories represent the top & bottom section of the B, and are connected to each other using a small central lean-to section.
  • L-shape Conservatories: Normally situated to wrap around an outer corner of the house and usually a variation on the lean to conservatory design.
  • T-shape Conservatories: If you can imagine a letter T that has a wide top and a short “leg”, then that is, more or less, what a T-shaped conservatory looks like. The widest part of the conservatory adjoins the property wall and there is usually a centre section that utilises the look of a Gable or Pavilion conservatory.

Conservatory Prices for this type of bespoke home extension reflect both the size and complexity of the rooms.

How much do Bespoke Conservatories Cost?

 

online conservatory prices

Glass Conservatory Costs.

Of late, there is a trend developing for the more contemporary conservatory designs, and that is for full glass frameless conservatories.

These “glass boxes” are truly individually designed bespoke creations and a lot more expensive than a typical conservatory.

Frameless conservatories make extensive use of structural laminated glass in the walls and top. These industrial strength glass panels also feature many energy saving elements which allow the rooms to be maintained at a comfortable living temperature all year long.

Modern Conservatory Two Designs

Modern Conservatory Two Designs

How much do glass conservatories cost?

As a high-end bespoke conservatory (and an architect inspired one), frameless glass box conservatory prices are healthy, to say the least.

Conservatory prices for contemporary glass rooms can range from £30,000, with the upper end of the scale going well over £50,000.

Orangery Conservatory Costs.

OrangeriesOrangeries are considered by some to be the “upmarket version”, but with some truly amazing conservatory designs that are already seriously up-market themselves, this distinction is becoming a little blurred.

Having said that, Orangeries are typically larger, more complex and more of a half-way-house between a regular house extension and a conservatory. Therefore, the average orangery will be a bigger task to take on board and will come with needing a bigger capital investment.

The basic differences between an orangery and conservatory firstly lie in the roofing. The top of a conservatory is angled and heavily sloped. The top of an orangery is flat with a central raised lantern or dome (the lantern can be glazed or solid – I’ve seen leaded lanterns in some).

Secondly, there is the wider use of solid walls, columns and pillars in orangery design. Your average conservatory is likely to be 65% to 75% glazed, it’s almost the reverse for an orangery.

How much does an orangery cost?

 

online conservatory prices

Conservatory Roof Costs.

What about the type of roofing for a conservatory?

Maybe you are thinking that you are stuck with the standard design that comes with a particular conservatory design, but that is not the case.

In general, there are only two situations to consider:

  1. What type of style do you want on your new conservatory?
  2. Changing the style of your current conservatory.

2 conservatory roof styles

In the first case, it is really just a matter of finding a roof design that suits your personal taste and is complementary to the overall conservatory design itself. In this instance the price of everything is included in the total conservatory costs.

In the second, not only do you need to choose a design, you also have to know if the existing conservatory frames can take the weight of the new installation – especially if you are changing from a light-weight polycarbonate design to a solid tiled installation.

The cheapest conservatory roof will be a polycarbonate one. Because the material is low cost, light and easy to fit.  If you do go for a polycarbonate conservatory roof, then make sure you use multi-chambered sheets for the job. They may also be called twin-wall or triple-wall sheets.

Poly-carbonate sheets are used for a lot of different purposes, but you can use the following as a general guide as to which version suit which purpose the best.

  • 4mm: Green-house or garden shed.
  • 10mm: Car ports or canopies.
  • 16mm: Car ports, Pergola or canopy.
  • 25mm: Canopies, small garden rooms & Pergolas, some conservatories.
  • 32mm: Suitable for a Conservatory.
  • 35mm: Suitable for a Conservatory.
How much does a conservatory roof cost?

Replacement conservatory roofs will be individually priced according to the job in hand. For a new conservatory the cost is not easily arrived at. But you could get a quote for a conservatory with a polycarbonate design, one with a double glazed version and then one that is tiled. You could then compare the quotes to see the extra costs involved for a glass or tiled version.

For a replacement, conservatory costs are going to depend on the type of roof you want and also the amount of labour needed to remove the old one. There may also be structural strengthening needed for the existing framework.

But to give you a rough idea of replacement conservatory roof prices:

  • Tiled conservatory prices range from around £4,500 to £8,000 dependent on size.
  • Double glazed conservatory prices can range from around £3,000 to £4,000 for a 3 x 3. Conservatory.

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More Conservatory Costs to Bear in Mind

Conservatory Bases Cost.

One of the very important parts of any conservatory will be the foundations or conservatory base. Poor foundations can lead to your conservatory distorting or even totally failing if the foundations are not sound.

Basically there are 3 options for conservatory foundations.

  1. Prefabricated steel frames: These bases are simply a steel grid the exact size and shape of your conservatory that is sat upon a series of concrete pads. The advantages of using a steel base are that it is quick to construct, strong enough to support your conservatory properly and does not require digging trenches. If you have a lot of services underground, such as water mains, drains or cables, a steel base could be the ideal solution. (http://www.durabase.co.uk/)
  2. Concrete slab: A simple concrete slab may be enough to support your conservatory adequately. This entails removing the topsoil until you get to the more stable sub-soil. A layer of hardcore stone is then laid and needs to be compressed with a roller or whacker. Timber shuttering is then built to size and the concrete poured within the shutters. Steel reinforcing mats are inserted into the concrete before it solidifies. A cost effective and fast way to build a conservatory foundation base.
  3. Trench footings: By far the most stable type of foundation. A series of trenches are dug in the outline of your proposed conservatory. Once they are deep enough to hit solid stable ground, concrete is poured into the trench – the thickness will depend upon the load it needs to carry. Brick or block walls are then build up to you required floor level and a reinforced concrete slab is poured to form the floor of your conservatory. The most labour & material intensive method and is reflected in the cost.

For something like a 3×3 conservatory, steel bases are quite popular, due to speed and cost.

If you already have an existing conservatory, but you want to replace it, then you can save yourself money by making use of the existing base. However, have it checked out by a professional before you build upon it.

Conservatory Flooring cost.

It’s a good idea to plan in advance what type of conservatory flooring you prefer. With many options come many prices. Your conservatory, at the end of the main construction phase, will be left with a bare concrete floor.

Options to consider would be:

  • Vinyl floor coverings such as wood effect, stone effect, photo effect, oak effect or sparkle flooring (http://www.harveymaria.com/Floor-Range)
  • Solid timber or laminate wood flooring. They have great designs, colours and patterns (https://www.floorsdirectltd.co.uk/).
  • Tiled flooring. Hundreds of choices for design, colour or size (https://www.wickes.co.uk/Products/Tiles/Floor-Tiles/c/1000803)
  • Carpet: So obvious we could not leave it out.
Conservatory heating cost.

How are you going to keep your conservatory warm during the colder months? Mobile heaters are one solution, but they can have their drawbacks, such as getting in the way, potential hazards for young children and can be relatively costly to run.

A more familiar solution is to install a hot water radiator system. You may be surprised at the number of “designer radiators” there are and how they can really make a big impact (https://www.theradiatorcentre.com/designer).

You could also look into underfloor heating. There are 2 systems, wet & dry. Wet underfloor heating systems use plastic pipes, laid on top of the concrete base but under the finished floor surface, to circulate hot water around. Dry systems use electrical heating elements.

It is possible to fit either type as “aftermarket” but are best fitted during construction. Fitting afterward will raise the internal floor level by a couple of inches (http://underfloor-heating-company.com/).

Compliance with Building Regulations & Planning Permission for Conservatories.

Without going into too much detail, you might well expect that there are building controls in place for home extensions such as a conservatory or orangery.

In certain circumstances, it may be that your conservatory does not require planning permission under the permitted development criteria. However, that does not mean in all cases. There are some strict rules to follow.

But, for sure, you will need planning permission of some sort if you live in a listed building, an area of special scientific interest (ASSI), an area of outstanding natural beauty (AONB) or if your conservatory is going to take up more than 50% of the plot around your home. That figure also has to include any previous extensions.

Which is the best conservatory for your home?

It may be that a nice little 3 x 3 lean-to conservatory is exactly the right thing for your home, or maybe not. Each project is as different as the property, and the people who live there.

So, at the end of the day, it’s probably going to come down to choosing the conservatory design you like the look of the most, and also fits your budget.

There are a few things to consider that also impact on conservatory prices, such as:

  • Small, medium or large conservatory?
  • UPVC, Engineered Timber, Aluminium or hardwood?
  • Modern style or Period style?
  • Solid or glazed roof?

online conservatory pricesIn any event, a good quality conservatory has been estimated to add around 10% the resale value of a property, which means you are definitely making a good investment as well as adding that new living space.

Let us help find you the most competitive conservatory prices in the market. Pop over to our quote request page by clicking the button below, leave a few short details about your project and then sit back and relax – we will bring the experts to you.

Free written quotes for conservatory costs from Accredited Local or National Installers to compare at your leisure.

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